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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Mon January 9, 2012

Iran Sentences Former U.S. Marine To Death, Accused Him Of Spying

An American man has been sentenced to death in Iran after a court there convicted him of working for the CIA and going to the Persian nation to spy.

The family of Amir Mirzaei Hekmati, a 28-year-old former U.S. Marine, says he was in Iran to visit his grandmothers.

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Political Junkie
6:45 am
Mon January 9, 2012

Mitt Romney, New Hampshire And The 'Expectations Game'

Romney's N.H. victory celebration four years ago was premature. But it may not be this time.
Ken Rudin collection

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 2:09 pm

A handful of new polls are out, all of which have Mitt Romney ahead in the Jan. 21 South Carolina primary by varying margins.

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Strange News
6:24 am
Mon January 9, 2012

English Pub Serves Non-Alcoholic Beer To Dogs

A pub in Newcastle, England, is taking its pet-friendly policy to new levels. It is serving dogs beer. The special brew is made of malt, hops and meat extract — it's non-alcoholic

Around the Nation
6:18 am
Mon January 9, 2012

New Hampshire Eatery Bans Politicians

GOP presidential candidates have swarmed the state ahead of Tuesday primary election. The candidates have been at local establishments shaking hands and sipping coffee. One Portsmouth restaurant had enough unannounced visits. The staff of Colby's Breakfast and Lunch posted a sign on their door: No Politicians, No Exceptions.

Election 2012
4:00 am
Mon January 9, 2012

Pawlenty, Christie Help Romney Campaign In N.H.

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 6:27 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep in Manchester, New Hampshire.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene in Washington.

It's not easy for a presidential candidate to win both the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary. Barack Obama didn't do it four years ago, nor did John McCain. But this year, Mitt Romney is getting closer to pulling it off.

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Election 2012
4:00 am
Mon January 9, 2012

Huntsman's Crowds Grow But They're Still Small

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 11:16 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Behind Mitt Romney in the New Hampshire polls comes Ron Paul, and then several men battling for third. Including Jon Huntsman, the former Utah governor and ambassador to China.

Robert Siegel of NPR's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED has been following him around here in New Hampshire. Hi, Robert.

ROBERT SIEGEL, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: What have you seen?

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Analysis
4:00 am
Mon January 9, 2012

Politics In The News

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 6:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, whoever wins the Republican nomination has to face President Obama, who got some meaningful news on Friday, when unemployment figures improved again. For that part of the story, let's turn to NPR's Cokie Roberts, as we do most Monday mornings. Cokie, good morning.

COKIE ROBERTS, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: How important are those job figures?

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Election 2012
4:00 am
Mon January 9, 2012

N.H. Female Voters Weigh In On Primary Issues

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 10:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Presidential candidates are making their appeals in events all over New Hampshire. But if you want to know what voters are thinking, it's better to drop by somebody's house, for a cup of coffee. Or, something stronger.

Hey, how are you?

SAMANTHA BOUDREAU: Hi, I'm Samantha Boudreau.

INSKEEP: Hi Samantha. I'm Steve.

BOUDREAU: Nice to meet you.

INSKEEP: Hi.

JEAN BELL: Jean Bell.

INSKEEP: Hi, Jean. Thanks for joining us. I really appreciate it.

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Business
4:00 am
Mon January 9, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 6:27 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a ban on mining.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: A 20-year ban on new mining near the Grand Canyon is expected to be finalized today by Interior Secretary Ken Salazar. The ban would protect a million acres close to that American icon. Conservation groups are hailing the decision, but the mining industry and some Republicans say a permanent ban will hurt the nation's energy independence and also Arizona's economy. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
4:00 am
Mon January 9, 2012

Tucson Remembers Tragic Shooting 1 Year Ago

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 6:27 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Last night in Tucson, Arizona Representative Gabrielle Giffords made a rare public appearance at a vigil marking the anniversary of the shooting there last year. Giffords was shot in the head, a dozen others were wounded and six people were killed.

NPR's Ted Robbins attended a weekend of memorial events.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELLS)

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Sports
4:00 am
Mon January 9, 2012

Tebow's 80-Yard Pass Sends Steelers Home

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This morning, a lot of NFL football fans are still talking about the first weekend of the playoffs. And what a weekend it was. It looks like Tebow time is back in business. After several weeks of downright awful performances, Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow delivered what his fans are calling the latest miracle in his young NFL career. Tebow's 80-yard pass play with wide receiver Demaryius Thomas on the first play of overtime clinched a stunning playoff win over the Pittsburgh Steelers, 29 to 23, last night.

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Law
12:01 am
Mon January 9, 2012

Texas Redrawn: Voting Rights, States' Power In Court

The Texas State Capitol in Austin. The Lone Star State is gaining four additional congressional seats because of its booming population, but its redistricting plans are in limbo.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 3:10 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Monday in a tangle of Texas redistricting cases, with repercussions beyond the Lone Star State. Consolidated into one test, the cases pit the Voting Rights Act and its protections for minority voters against state legislative powers — with an overlaying sheen of sheer political calculus.

The case has been called a puzzle of three courts, a reference to the interplay between two lower courts and the Supreme Court.

A Chance To Redraw

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Europe
12:01 am
Mon January 9, 2012

Italy's Accordion Industry: Tiny And Thriving

Italy's famed accordion industry has all the business it wants — but there are limits to its ambitions.
Marco Di Lauro Getty Images

More than 70 percent of Italy's gross domestic product comes from small businesses — and they're not growing. Economists are worried this will make it impossible for Italy to climb out of its massive $2.6 trillion debt.

Even in a global economy, something as small as Italy's accordion industry can have an impact. The work of its craftsmen has reached millions of ears.

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The Salt
12:01 am
Mon January 9, 2012

For Kids With ADHD, Some Foods May Complement Treatment

Eliminating junk food from a child's diet is usually not enough to effectively treat attention deficit disorders, a paper shows.
Tarah Dawdy via Flickr

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 3:55 pm

You may remember the controversial studies linking food coloring and additives to hyperactivity in kids. Or you may know parents who have pinned their hopes on an elimination diet to improve their kids' rowdy behavior.

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History
12:01 am
Mon January 9, 2012

Dancing Through History With First Ladies' Gowns

First lady Michelle Obama's inaugural gown.
Hugh Talman Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:09 am

Every four years in January, Washington, D.C., plays host to the country's biggest "prom." Inaugural balls bring out happy winners, administration bigwigs and a gown — on the first lady — that will become a part of history.

An exhibition at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History displays some of those gowns. NPR Special Correspondent Susan Stamberg took her dance card to the show.

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The Arab Spring: One Year Later
12:01 am
Mon January 9, 2012

Is The Arab Spring Good Or Bad For The U.S.?

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 9:09 am

The Arab uprisings have ousted or weakened some American allies. Elections in Tunisia and Egypt have shown the strength of Islamist political parties. And after the long, hard war in Iraq, the U.S. appears to have a diminished appetite for new, complicated undertakings in the region. In the last of our six-part series on the upheavals changing the Middle East, NPR's Deborah Amos looks at what it all means for America.

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Election 2012
5:45 pm
Sun January 8, 2012

The New Hampshire Primary: Boost Or Bust

Political signs are pictured at an intersection in Manchester, New Hampshire.
Matthew Cavanaugh Getty Images

Originally published on Sun January 8, 2012 6:06 pm

New Hampshire voters could make Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's nomination a near-certainty on Tuesday, when the state holds the first primary of the 2012 election.

Every presidential candidate in modern history who has won both Iowa and New Hampshire has gone on to win the party's nomination. (Romney narrowly won the Iowa caucuses last week). Since 1920, New Hampshire has been the first state to hold a presidential primary, and Granite State voters guard that status fiercely.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Sun January 8, 2012

The State Of Play In The GOP Presidential Field

The six remaining Republican presidential candidates held two debates over the past 24 hours — one Saturday night, another Sunday morning. Guy Raz talks to NPR National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson about what transpired in those debate.

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Sun January 8, 2012

Tucson Marks Anniversary Of Giffords Shooting

Originally published on Sun January 8, 2012 6:06 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF BELLS RINGING)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Just a few hours ago, bells rang across Tucson in remembrance of the first anniversary of the shootings there, which left six people dead and wounded 13 others, including Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords. That day, a gunman fired more than 30 shots at a constituent event hosted by Giffords outside a Safeway supermarket. NPR's Ted Robbins joins me now from in front of that Safeway. Ted, it's hard to believe it's already been a year.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Sun January 8, 2012

Preview Of BCS Bowl Game

Originally published on Sun January 8, 2012 6:06 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

So tomorrow night for the first time in the history of the Bowl Championship Series, two teams from the same conference, the Southeastern Conference, the two best teams in college football, Louisiana State University and the University of Alabama, will face off in the BCS National Championship in New Orleans. Who's going to win? Well, to help us answer that question, Mike Pesca joins me now.

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Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Sun January 8, 2012

Newark, N.J., Seeks To Revamp Shopping District

The city plans to revitalize its once-glitzy downtown shopping district. New Jersey News Service reporter Nancy Solomon tours Broad Street with Newark's head of economic development, and reports on plans to lure back high-end shoppers.

Author Interviews
2:46 pm
Sun January 8, 2012

A Self-Published Author's $2-Million Cinderella Story

Amanda Hocking is the best-selling author of the Trylle trilogy and six additional self-published novels.
Mariah Paaverud St. Martin's Griffin

Best-selling e-author Amanda Hocking grew up in the small town of Austin, Minn., which, she says, is known for Spam. Spam as in the food, not the e-mail spam.

"We invented Spam," the 27-year-old novelist tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

Hocking's dad was a truck driver. Her mom was a waitress. Even as a very young child, she had always been a kind of natural storyteller — especially when it came to fantasy stories. Stories about dragons, unicorns, pirates and more.

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It's All Politics
1:21 pm
Sun January 8, 2012

Days Before Primary, N.H. Restaurant Bans Presidential Candidates

During this final sprint toward Tuesday's New Hampshire primary, candidate stops will be full of local diners and doughnut shops where the presidential hopefuls can chat up "real" voters — locals who stop in for a meal or a coffee.

But customers in one New Hampshire restaurant are over it. In response, a Portsmouth breakfast spot has banned candidates completely, reports Seacoast Online:

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It's All Politics
11:53 am
Sun January 8, 2012

Finally, Romney's Opponents Take Aim

The Republican presidential candidates duke it out at the NBC News-Facebook debate on Meet the Press on Sunday.
Alex Wong Getty Images

At last, the rivals who were supposed to savage front-runner Mitt Romney in the final weekend before Tuesday's primary in New Hampshire got down to business.

In the opening minutes of their debate Sunday on NBC's Meet the Press, several of those chasing Romney in the polls let fly the roundhouse punches they'd been pulling through weeks and months of TV debates.

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Music Interviews
10:44 am
Sun January 8, 2012

Deathbed Music: The Final Works of Famous Composers

A 1791 painting Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on his deathbed, surrounded by his wife and friends.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

When it comes to last words, there's a kind of poetry in even the oddest ones. Oscar Wilde hated the wallpaper in the room where he died: "One of us has to go," he muttered. Salvador Dali: "Where is my clock?" Steve Jobs: "Oh wow, oh wow, oh wow," according to his sister, who was in the room.

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Remembrances
9:55 am
Sun January 8, 2012

Letters To Tucson, One Year After The Shooting

Originally published on Sun January 8, 2012 10:16 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MONTAGE OF PEOPLE SAYING "DEAR TUCSON")

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's been a year since a gunman opened fire at a Tucson grocery store. Six people were killed and 13 injured, including Representative Gabrielle Giffords. NPR's State of the Re:Union asked people who were present that day at the shooting to write letters to Tucson, reflecting on their city and the year since the tragedy.

RON BARBER: Unlike most places, Tucson is green in the dead of winter.

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Author Interviews
8:16 am
Sun January 8, 2012

'Orphan': A New Novel Imagines Life In North Korea

istockphoto.com

When North Korean President Kim Jong Il died last month, media outlets around the world tried to cover the story with very few facts. That's because there really are no clear facts about North Korea. It's arguably the most closed society in the world — run as a hereditary fiefdom by a family of dictators.

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Education
8:00 am
Sun January 8, 2012

Classes Teach Soldiers To Be 'Army Strong'

Two years ago, the U.S. Army launched a program to teach soldiers how to be emotionally and psychologically strong. This week, the Army released a review of the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program. Host Rachel Martin speaks with the program's director, Brig. Gen. James Pasquarette, and Sgt. 1st Class Michael Ballard, a resiliency trainer in the program, about what it takes to prepare troops mentally for combat.

Politics
8:00 am
Sun January 8, 2012

U.S. Reconsiders Egypt Aid After NGOs Raided

Originally published on Sun January 8, 2012 10:16 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Pull back U.S. military aid to Egypt. That is the call from some on Capitol Hill these days. Congress is furious about raids last month by Egyptian security forces on pro-democracy groups in Cairo. The nonprofit groups include the National Democratic Institute, Freedom House and the International Republican Institute. All these groups get U.S. funding and they're in the country helping monitor Egypt's parliamentary elections.

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Around the Nation
8:00 am
Sun January 8, 2012

The Tucson Shooting: A Solemn Remembrance

One year ago Sunday a gunman opened fire while Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords was holding a "Congress on Your Corner" event at a shopping center. She was shot in the head, one of 13 who were wounded. Six others were killed. Tucson is remembering the day with memorials, a candle-light vigil and dozens of other events. Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's Ted Robbins about the day's services.

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