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Country/Americana
2:29 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

The Little Willies: For The Wrenching 'Good Times'

The Little Willies' For the Good Times brings together five accomplished musicians of varying musical backgrounds.
Courtesy of the artist

It's been six years since The Little Willies released an eponymous debut album.

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The Salt
2:24 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

Does The Queen of Unhealthy Eating Have To Eat Her Words?

Paula Deen tells Today show co-host Al Roker that she has Type 2 diabetes.
Peter Kramer ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Tue January 17, 2012 3:25 pm

There were hints that all was not well in Paula Deen's Southern-fried world. Last November, when NPR correspondent Allison Aubrey asked Deen if she'd ever do healthier versions of her greasy, sugar-laden fare, Deen said: "As I age, and get older and I get 'different things' that I have to battle physically — it may, you know, resonate closer to home for me."

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Media
2:14 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

In Britain, Calls To Regulate A Freewheeling Press

British tabloids such as The Sun are known for being brash, cheeky and salacious.
Carl Court AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 17, 2012 7:19 pm

The voice mail and computer hacking and police bribery scandal that has roiled the British newspaper industry has also led to calls for government regulation of the press in one of the world's greatest democracies.

Some newspaper executives, such as Paul Dacre, editor of the Daily Mail and editor-in-chief of the Mail on Sunday, are attempting to draw the line.

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The Two-Way
2:00 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

One Of World's Oldest Cypress Trees, 'The Senator,' Burns In Florida

On Monday (Jan. 16, 2012) Seminole County firefighter Al Caballero applied water to the smoldering base of The Senator.
Phelan M. Ebenhack AP

Originally published on Tue January 17, 2012 2:03 pm

Investigators are now saying arson was not the likely cause of a fire that on Monday destroyed a cypress tree in Central Florida that was an estimated 3,500 years old — making it perhaps the oldest such tree in the nation and one of the oldest in the world.

Known as "The Senator," the tree that once stood 165 feet tall (before a hurricane lopped off about 45 feet in 1925) was more likely brought down by a fire that had been smoldering inside it — without being detected — since a lightning strike about a week ago, investigators say.

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The Two-Way
1:39 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

Los Angeles Set To Approve Condom Requirement In Porn Shoots

A condom.
iStockphoto.com

The Los Angeles City Council is poised to approve a measure today that would require adult film stars to wear condoms when making films. The AP reports that last week, the council voted 11-1 for preliminary approval.

The new requirement is controversial in the porn industry. NPR's Alex Cohen explored the issue back in 2010. Essentially, the industry claims condoms hurt sales and their method of testing actors every 30 days is effective.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
1:26 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

Should The U.N. Admit Palestine As A Full Member State?

Mustafa Barghouthi (from left), Daniel Levy, debate moderator John Donvan, Dore Gold and Aaron David Miller speak before an audience in New York on the motion "The U.N. Should Admit Palestine As A Full Member State."
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Sat January 21, 2012 10:20 am

  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

Last September, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas requested full membership to the United Nations for a state of Palestine.

With negotiations between Israeli and Palestinian leaders at a stalemate, is there another approach that could offer a diplomatic solution for peace?

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Shots - Health Blog
1:08 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

Obesity Epidemic May Have Peaked In U.S.

The nation's obesity epidemic appears to have hit a plateau, according to the latest federal data released Tuesday.

Obesity soared in the U.S. during the 1980s and 1990s, doubling among adults and tripling among children. That raised widespread alarm and debate about the causes and possible solutions. Obesity can increase the risk for diabetes, heart disease, cancer and other serious health problems.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

The Muse Behind 'Tuesdays with Dorie'

Alan Richardson

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 10:13 am

New Year's resolutions have notoriously short lifetimes, but for a blogger in Pittsburgh named Laurie Woodward, a promise to herself became an Internet sensation.

Woodward was inspired to bake one recipe each week from Dorie Greenspan's popular cookbook Baking From My Home To Yours. And she found plenty of company — more than 100 bakers decided to take up the challenge with her. Every week, they made a recipe and posted their cooking stories to the online community Tuesdays with Dorie.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

Please 'Stop Doing That': Redefining Good Manners

John Woo

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 1:36 pm

We've all witnessed bad manners: The rider who showers the bus with his uncovered sneeze; the woman who cuts into the movie line; the person texting mid-film at the movie theater.

But while we know bad manners when we see them, good manners can be harder to define. What's the problem with saying "No problem" as a substitute for "You're welcome"? Is it acceptable to answer a phone call with an email? Is it offensive to ask a taxi driver where he's from?

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

In Ship Accident's Wake, Scrutiny Turns To Captain

Five more bodies were recovered Tuesday from the Italian cruise ship that ran aground off the shore of Tuscany. Prosecutors have accused Capt. Francesco Schettino of manslaughter for abandoning the ship before evacuation was complete. Maritime law professor Bob Jarvis offers insight into the responsibilities of ship captains.

From Our Listeners
1:00 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

Letters: Independent Voters, U.S. Marines Video

NPR's Neal Conan reads from listener comments on previous show segments, including responses to a conversation about independent voters, and a video depicting U.S. Marines desecrating the bodies of Taliban fighters.

Middle East
1:00 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

As Tensions Rise, Some See 'Covert War' With Iran

U.S. plans for sanctions on Iran are escalating what some analysts call a covert war between the two countries. Patrick Clawson, director of the Washington Institute's Iran Security Initiative, and Columbia University's Gary Sick discuss how the Obama administration should deal with Iran.

The Two-Way
12:38 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

Canada's Harper Says His Country Is 'Held Hostage' By U.S. In Pipeline Debate

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper.
Adrian Wyld AP

Originally published on Tue January 17, 2012 12:44 pm

In an interview with the CBC, yesterday, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper had some harsh words for the United States and its side of the Keystone XL pipeline debate.

"I don't object to foreigners expressing their opinion," Harper told the CBC. "But I don't want them to be able to hijack the process so that we don't make a decision that's timely or in the interests of Canadians."

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It's All Politics
12:35 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

Romney Says He's Taxed At 15 Percent Rate

Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney at a campaign rally in Florence, S.C., earlier today (Jan. 17, 2012).
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 17, 2012 5:51 pm

He has probably paid an effective federal income tax rate of about 15 percent in recent years, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney told reporters in South Carolina a short time ago.

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Movie Reviews
11:48 am
Tue January 17, 2012

'A Separation' Of Hearts, Minds And Ideas In Iran

Simin (Leila Hatami) and Nader (Peyman Moadi) are at odds first about whether to leave Iran for life abroad — and then about more pressing issues.
Sony Picture Classics.

Over the past 30-odd years, we've grown used to thinking of Iran and the United States as enemies — from the Ayatollah Khomeini dubbing America "The Great Satan" to the dispute over Iran's nuclear program, which has led President Obama to spearhead international sanctions and some of his Republican rivals to talk of bombing Iran.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:35 am
Tue January 17, 2012

Seeing Doctors' Notes Could Help Patients Change Ways

iStockphoto.com

If patients and doctors both have easy access to the notes the doctor takes during their office visits, will it change their behavior?

That's a question that an experiment called OpenNotes aims to answer by letting patients of more than 100 primary care doctors in three states see the notes online.

In December, researchers reported the results of surveys taken before the project started in 2010 in which patients and physicians were asked about their attitudes toward making such information available.

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The Two-Way
11:15 am
Tue January 17, 2012

$45 Million Hospital Bill: It's Enough To Really Make You Sick

With a bill that big, you'll need quite a stack of these.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Morning Edition's staff noticed a story from over the long holiday weekend that's just too much of a "no-way!" not to pass along.

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Author Interviews
10:38 am
Tue January 17, 2012

Writing About The Midwestern Muslim Experience

Ayad Akhtar is a first generation Pakistani-American screenwriter and playwright from Milwaukee. American Dervish is his first novel.
Nina Subin Little, Brown

Playwright Ayad Akhtar's debut novel, American Dervish, tells the story of Hayat Shah, a Pakistani-American boy in Milwaukee coming to terms with his religion and identity.

Ahktar says that he drew from the sensibilities of Jewish writers and filmmakers like Saul Bellow, Philip Roth and Woody Allen when thinking about how to give form to his experiences growing up as a young Muslim in the Midwest.

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The Two-Way
10:30 am
Tue January 17, 2012

'Get On Board!' Coast Guard Officer Rages At Italian Cruise Ship Captain

The cruise ship Costa Concordia, earlier today (Jan. 17, 2012).
Laura Lezza Getty Images
  • NPR's Sylvia Poggioli, reporting on the dramatic phone call

Dramatic audio has emerged of an irate Italian Coast Guard officer ordering the captain of the cruise ship Costa Concordia to "get back on board!" as the stricken vessel lay crippled off the coast of Tuscany on Friday night.

As NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports, in the telephone call Coast Guard Capt. Gregorio De Falco shouts as he accuses Costa Concordia Capt. Francesco Schettino of abandoning his ship. Schettino was apparently sitting in a row boat at the time.

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It's All Politics
8:45 am
Tue January 17, 2012

Is Obama Really The 'Food Stamp President'? Fact-checking The S.C. Debate

PolitiFact's "Barely True" rating.
PolitiFact

Bill Adair, editor of PolitiFact.com and Washington bureau chief for The St. Petersburg Times, and PolitiFact.com's Angie Drobnic Holan wrote about how candidates at the Myrtle Beach, S.C. debate rated on PolitiFact's Truth-O-Meter for PolitiFact.com and It's All Politics:

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Tue January 17, 2012

Fuel Is Flowing To Nome Through Half-Mile Hose Laid Over Ice

There's good news to report about the struggle to get much-needed gasoline and diesel fuel to the 3,500 people of Nome, Alaska:

"Crews on Monday afternoon began transferring 1.3 million gallons of fuel from a Russian fuel tanker" to the "iced-in" city, The Associated Press reports.

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The Two-Way
7:45 am
Tue January 17, 2012

Egypt's Wael Ghonim: 'Revolutions Are Processes ... It Will Take Time'

Wael Ghonim talking with reporters on Feb. 8, 2011, in Cairo's Tahrir Square as protests there continued.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 17, 2012 7:50 am

  • NPR's Steve Inskeep talks with Wael Ghonim

It's been nearly a year since Google executive Wael Ghonim became one of the faces of the Arab Spring as his online organizing efforts and his arrest helped draw people and attention to the demands by many Egyptians for reform — a movement that led to the toppling of President Hosni Mubarak's regime.

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The Two-Way
7:15 am
Tue January 17, 2012

Hopes Are Fading For Missing In Italian Cruise Ship Disaster

  • NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports

Divers and other rescue personnel are still trying to reach areas of the cruise ship Costa Concordia that haven't yet been explored in a bid to see if any of the 29 people who remain unaccounted for after Friday's crash off the Italian coast of Tuscany might be alive.

But as the BBC reports, hopes are fading. As of this hour, six people are known to have died. More than 4,200 passengers and crew were on board when it struck rocks, took on water and listed on to its starboard side.

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It's All Politics
7:02 am
Tue January 17, 2012

The Huntsman Saga: Another Media Favorite Takes The Fall

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman was surrounded by members of the media during a campaign stop earlier this month in Dover, N.H.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 17, 2012 10:36 am

There could not have been more apt an epitaph. The once-promising campaign of former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman came to an end within hours of his being endorsed by The Columbia State, South Carolina's largest and most influential newspaper, within days of that state's Republican primary.

The woman who wrote the State's endorsing editorial said she felt as if she'd been wooed and won and abandoned by her newly betrothed. Indeed, over the course of his campaign, Huntsman left more than a few journalists feeling jilted.

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Business
7:01 am
Tue January 17, 2012

Wikipedia To Protest Anti-Piracy Bill

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Remember life before Wikipedia? Well, I don't, but tomorrow, we'll all get to revisit those days. The English-language version of the online encyclopedia will shut down for 24 hours, protesting an anti-piracy bill in Congress. Visitors to Wikipedia will be encouraged to call Congress. The site's co-founder, Jimmy Wales, tweeted he hopes visitors will melt the phone systems in Washington. He also warned students: Do your homework early. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:52 am
Tue January 17, 2012

$45 Million Hospital Bill Startles N.Y. Man

Alexis Rodriguez was treated for pneumonia, and received a bill for nearly $45 million. Grateful as he was for the care, the unemployed doorman complained. The Daily News reports the billing firm printed the invoice number instead of the price: $300.

Election 2012
4:00 am
Tue January 17, 2012

South Carolina's Tea Party Mulls GOP Candidates

The Republican presidential candidates gathered last night In Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, for a debate. Myrtle Beach is also the site for the first convention of the South Carolina Tea Party Coalition.

Election 2012
4:00 am
Tue January 17, 2012

GOP Rivals Rachet Up Intensity In S.C. Debate

Under heavy pressure from his rivals, front-runner Mitt Romney defended his record as a venture capitalist. He also insisted he bears no responsibility for attack ads aired by his allies, and grudgingly said he might release his income tax returns this spring.

Author Interviews
4:00 am
Tue January 17, 2012

'Revolution 2.0': Social Media's Role In Removing Mubarak From Power

Egyptian cyber activist and former Google executive Wael Ghonim talks to Steve Inskeep about his new book Revolution 2.0, which chronicles his role, and that of social media, in the toppling the regime of Hosni Mubarak.

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