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The Pentagon says two Americans were shot and killed in Afghanistan on Wednesday, and at least two others were wounded. One of those who died was a service member, the other was a civilian.

NPR's Tom Bowman reported the assailant opened fire at the entrance to an ammunition depot near Camp Morehead, a training center for Afghan commandos. The camp is about an hour's drive south of Kabul.

As Tom reported for our Newscast unit:

About 1.5 million people clasped hands, creating a human chain that stretched 250 miles through Catalonia to demonstrate they no longer wanted the northeastern region to be part of Spain.

It was 2013, and American writer and translator Liz Castro was a link in that chain.

She said it was one of the most remarkable experiences she’s had fighting to make her adopted home a new European nation.

“I think we really proved to ourselves that we had this mobilizing ability, this organizational capacity,” she said. “And people were happy.”

Regulators in Malaysia are trying to make something clear to food consumers: Hot dogs do not have dog meat in them.

According to The Associated Press, the Malaysian Islamic Development Department, a religious regulatory authority, has asked the U.S. company to change the name of its popular "pretzel dog" frankfurter wrapped in pretzel bread in order to obtain official halal certification.

Faculty members at more than a dozen Pennsylvania public universities went on strike on Wednesday. The Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties represents educators at 14 public universities. The strike comes after negotiations broke down between the union and Pennsylvania's State System of Higher Education.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

This year's presidential election will be the first in a half-century without the significant presence of federal observers at polling places. That's because in 2013 the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, and when the court wiped out that section, the statute that provided for election observers went, too.

Generic drugs generally cost 80 percent less than brand-name drugs, so hopes were high when a law enacted in 2010 paved the way for competition among the highest-priced drugs of all, known as biologics.

But, as these competing drugs start to appear on the market, consumers aren't reaping a windfall.

Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters

Many Nigerians feared the family reunions would never happen.

But 21 school girls held for more than two years by the extremists of Boko Haram were reunited with their anguished families Sunday.

"As you can imagine, the parents were ecstatic. They were in tears," says Nigerian author and journalist Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani. "A mother carried her [released] daughter on her back and held her wrapped around her back for most of the ceremony."

In the aftermath of the Great Depression, the U.S. government set out to evaluate the riskiness of mortgages — and left behind a stunning portrait of the racism and discrimination that has shaped American housing policy.

Now a new digital tool makes it easier than ever to see that history in high-resolution.

A powerful super typhoon pounded the coast of the Philippines late Wednesday, and aid groups say they are preparing for possible wide-scale damage.

Super Typhoon Haima unleashed maximum sustained winds of 140 mph, with gusts reaching up to 195 mph. It made landfall at about 11 p.m. local time on Wednesday in Peñablanca, in the northern tip of the country, according to the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration.

This month on NPR, we’ve been hearing from voters about identity and politics, as part of an election-year project called “A Nation Engaged.” We’re asking people “what it means to be an American” and “what can the next president do to further that vision?”

Today, we have answers to those questions from a Mexican American named Marisol Flores Aguirre from Tucson, Arizona, and Greg Locke, a preacher from Tennessee.

Tonight in Nevada presidential nominees Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will debate for the third and final time before the election on Nov. 8.

It will be the first debate since Trump announced that “the shackles have been taken off.” So it remains to be seen how he’ll respond to Clinton, who holds a clear lead in national and most battleground state polls.

Sibling Economics In A Recession

20 hours ago

Economic mobility is critical to achieving the American dream, which centers on the hope that our children will be better off than we are.

To measure how the country is doing against that goal, experts typically look at how families do from one generation to the next. But what happens when there are class disparities among siblings?

Emiliano Villa from Here & Now contributor Youth Radio has the story.

Kishi Bashi On World Cafe

21 hours ago

Kaoru Ishibashi is a violin-playing songwriter and arranger who leads the band Kishi Bashi. After studying scoring at Berklee College of Music, he played as a sideman with Regina Spektor and Of Montreal. He formed Kishi Bashi in 2011, and the band has taken on many forms since then.

Filmmaker Barry Jenkins and playwright Tarell McCraney grew up just blocks away from each other in the same housing project in Miami's Liberty City neighborhood. They went to the same elementary school at the same time, but they did not meet until they were adults, when Jenkins contacted McCraney about adapting his play, In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue, to the screen.

A cease-fire brokered by the United Nations took hold in Yemen on Wednesday night. The U.N. hopes the break will allow humanitarian workers to deliver badly needed aid and pave the way for peace talks.

U.N. Special Envoy for Yemen Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed announced the deal on Monday. A statement from the U.N. said Ahmed "has received assurances from all Yemeni parties" that they will abide by the Cessation of Hostilities that he negotiated in April.

Who will be the World Health Organization's next director-general? In September, the U.N. agency announced the six nominees, four men and two women, ranging from a cardiologist from Pakistan to a former punk rocker from Hungary. Over the next few months, WHO member-states will whittle down the list to one final candidate, who will succeed the current director, Dr.

Closing arguments are underway in the trial of seven people accused of illegally occupying Oregon's Malheur National Wildlife Refuge last year.

A stone tool found in the sand has always been considered the handiwork of early humans and their ancestors. But a remarkable discovery in a Brazilian forest suggests that might not be so.

Scientists saw a group of capuchin monkeys making stone flakes, an important type of early tool. It's not clear the monkeys knew what they were making, but nonetheless, it might prompt researchers to be more cautious when they come across ancient sites where similar tools are usually attributed to early humans.

It has been a crazy few days for Ryan Griffin, the guy behind the Read-to-a-Barber program we wrote about on the NPR Ed blog last week. He says the phone at The Fuller Cut in Ypsilanti, Mich., has been ringing nonstop since the story ran.

You have a message from Codebreaker

22 hours ago
Bruce Johnson

The key starts with zero. Once you've cracked it head to

Stay updated on all things Codebreaker.

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ER visits continue, despite insurance

23 hours ago
D Gorenstein

Emergency rooms and hospitals are among the most expensive places to get health care. One of the big selling points for Obamacare was the idea that if people get insurance, they’ll have better preventive care and end up in the ER a lot less.

Today we have new data that buries that idea.

9 p.m. ET (We know you were wondering).

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump debate Wednesday night for the last time before Election Day in Las Vegas.

Here's what else you need to know to get caught up ahead of the third and final debate:

CBS is on board for Google's live TV service

23 hours ago
Kai Ryssdal

Competition is getting fiercer for web-only TV — Netflix and Amazon are expected to spend $5 billion and $1.5 billion on original content this year, respectively. But cable TV doesn't want to feel left out.

Psy-ops in the guest box continues at the third and final presidential debate.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are both using guest tickets in a calculated effort to rattle their rivals, or at least send a signal to voters watching on TV.

The in-your-face guest list includes two billionaire critics of Trump, the mother of a Benghazi victim, and President Obama's Kenya-born half-brother.

It's not just Barb, Netflix is also having a moment

23 hours ago
Sally Herships

Welcome to Hawkins. It’s a tiny town in Indiana — the setting for Netflix’s hit show, "Stranger Things." A small boy has gone missing. There’s a strange creature in the woods, flickering lights and people in the town are disappearing, one by one. The show is practically impossible not to binge watch.

Saudi Arabia has raised more than $17 billion in its first foray into the global bond markets, according to news reports, as the kingdom struggles to close a budget deficit caused by declining oil prices.

The sale is the largest-ever bond offering by an emerging-market country, topping Argentina's $16.5 billion offering in August.

"Saudi's multi-part debt offering drew heavy investor demand as the world's top oil exporter sought to borrow at historic low yields," Reuters reported.

If the old real estate adage holds true — it's all about location, location, location — then about 100 miles off the tip of Florida, it's boom time. The real estate market in Havana, Cuba, is roaring.

The communist country is seeing its colonial-style mansions and Art Deco apartments selling in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Add a Caribbean sea view or a prized spot in a pre-revolution, exclusive neighborhood, and the price can top a million bucks. The prices are soaring, along with speculation in this budding and risky all-cash real estate market.

Big banks profit by sticking to their knitting

Oct 19, 2016
Amy Scott

Morgan Stanley turned in a better-than-expected third quarter profit today, following similar news from Goldman Sachs Tuesday. Both banks reported a more than 50 percent rise in profits, driven by a rebound in trading. The news caps off a strong earnings season for big banks generally. JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup and Bank of America all beat analyst expectations.

This is in spite of grumbling that the Dodd-Frank financial regulations enacted after the financial crisis have made it harder for banks to make money.