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US Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Thomas Trower

This year's 4th of July won't be the same for the people of Feltwell, England.

There won't be any fireworks or any of the celebrations that normally are put on by the US Air Force base there. Royal Air Force Feltwell in Norfolk, Britain is used by the US Air Force.

Officials have announced that "due to local threat assessments," all celebrations are canceled.

REUTERS/John Vizcaino

Until recently, Colombia — a country once rife with violence — seemed relatively calm. But this summer has changed that, with a string of bombings targeting oil pipelines and now two offices in the capital of Bogota.

The most recent bombings took place Thursday, and targeted a private pension firm called Porvenir. At least seven people were hurt, though none of the injuries were severe.

Camila Kerwin

She was kidnapped by leftist guerrillas at age 11 and held for nearly a year.

Now, 13 years later, she's helping former guerrillas get reintegrated into society.

For more than a century, the copper spires of St. Laurentius have stood tall over Philadelphia's Fishtown. But the city's oldest Polish church — founded in 1882 — could soon face the wrecking ball.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Eddie Austin/Facebook.com/Kominas

Muslim Punk. Yeah, I know the label confuses people.

Just the word punk conjures up angry people. Then you add the word Muslim, and you get angry Muslim punks. It's a difficult stereotype to break.

But check out The Kominas. The name, by the way, means "scoundrels."

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Adapted from Solar Impulse

Now that a solar-powered plane has set an amazing record, we're ready with the next question: Will there soon be a fleet of solar-powered planes?

Not quite, but airlines are moving in that direction.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom share pieces that have kept them reading. They share tidbits using the #NPRreads hashtag — and on Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you five reads.

From Ina Jaffe, NPR's Los Angeles-based correspondent:

As they rapidly run out of cash, Greece's banks could hardly be in a more precarious position.

For months, as this crisis has intensified people have been slowly withdrawing their money. The banks have been able to do business only because of emergency loans from the European Central Bank.

But when Greece missed a payment to the International Monetary Fund this week, the ECB decided not to lend any more money.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In Florida, the official state animal triggers mixed feelings. The Florida panther has been on the endangered species list for nearly 50 years. From a low point in the 1970s when there were only about 20 panthers in the wild, the species has rebounded.

Now, nearly 200 range throughout southwest Florida. And some officials, ranchers and hunters in the state say that may be about enough.

Florida panthers are a subspecies of the cougar or mountain lion. They're slightly smaller than their cousins, but like them, the panthers need lots of room to roam.

This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

Recent attacks in North Carolina have heightened the negative public perception of sharks. But for 21-year-old Australian Madison Stewart, sharks are almost family.

Since she was in her early teens, Stewart has made it her mission to preserve and educate the world about the creatures she feels so passionate about.

As the Founding Fathers established the United States of America, they had their eyes on the future and they knew they were making history. But not everyone had the same opinion of the timeline of that history.

Most thought the big day was July 4, when then Continental Congress approved the text of the Declaration of Independence and sent it to the printer. But John Adams believed July 2, 1776, was the really the big day.

Molly Wood

Most people aren't paying for things with their phones just yet. If you are, maybe you're just getting used to using your fingerprint to authorize a transaction.

MasterCard is blazing right ahead with an app that will let you pay for items with your face.

Technically, you pay using your MasterCard, obviously. But to authorize your mobile payment, you look at your camera's selfie cam and blink once to prove you're a human.

A sun-powered airplane has landed in Hawaii after a five-day journey from Japan that smashed the previous record of 76 hours for the longest duration nonstop solo flight.

Pilot André Borschberg set the Solar Impulse 2 down on the tarmac at Kalaeloa Airport outside Honolulu after flying for 120 hours from Nagoya, his team reports.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

It's a bird! It's a plane! It's a ... trampoline?

9 hours ago
Instagram/<a data-reactid=".3.0.0.0.0.1.0" href="https://instagram.com/logreglan/" title="logreglan">logreglan</a>

Even in summer, Iceland is known for often being extremely cold and windy. But Icelanders are used to the cold, and the wind wouldn’t be such a problem … if it weren’t for the trampolines.

A solar-powered airplane is breaking records over the Pacific Ocean

10 hours ago
Thomas Peter/Reuters

Miles above the Pacific Ocean, Andre Borschberg is stuffed in the cockpit of a tiny solar plane — and he's at the point of no return.

If successful, Borschberg’s flight from Japan’s Nagoya Airfield to Hawaii will be the longest solo flight in history taken by a solar plane. The trip is expected to take five days, as the plane doesn’t go faster than about 35 miles per hour.

Iceland's minority Pirate Party has its first major legislative victory — repealing a 75-year-old blasphemy law that made it a crime to "ridicule or insult" the teachings of a legally recognized religious community.

The FCC is busy enforcing net neutrality

10 hours ago
Molly Wood

The Federal Communications Commission has now been in the business of enforcing net neutrality for a little less than a month and it's been busy. The FCC promptly fined AT&T $100 million for throttling some users unlimited data access. Sprint said it would stop doing the same thing now that the new rules are in effect. 

One formal net neutrality complaint has already been filed, and businesses and the government are trying to figure out what the Internet service game looks like now.

This Fourth of July, a tip from a Japanese grill

10 hours ago
Steve Dolinsky

This Fourth of July, why not go Japanese?

Any holiday BBQ'er could get a few tips from the first powerful whiffs of char-grilled chicken meat and skin wafting through the dining room of Robata JINYA, in Los Angeles, particularly around the perimeter of its square-shaped robata bar.

Molly Wood

It’s a holiday weekend, but there's still news to unpack before the Fourth of July barbecues can get started. Catherine Rampell from the Washington Post and Sudeep Reddy from the Wall Street Journal join Molly for this installment of the Weekly Wrap.

In the headlines:

The University of Washington lowers its tuition

An Internet insurrection is taking place on Reddit, where moderators have shut down many of the social sharing site's most popular sections in an apparent protest over the dismissal of Victoria Taylor.

In what could prove the largest-ever merger in the insurance industry, Aetna has announced a $37 billion deal to acquire rival Humana.

The agreement, announced by the Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna, "would bolster Aetna's presence in the state- and federally funded Medicaid program and Tricare coverage for military personnel and their families," according to The Associated Press.

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