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We are running out of ways to treat gonorrhea, the World Health Organization announced today.

The U.N. health agency released new guidelines warning doctors that it no longer recommends an entire class of antibiotics, quinolones, because quinolone-resistant strains of the disease have emerged all over the world.

Instead, the health agency recommends using cephalosporins, another class of antibiotic. The new protocol replaces guidelines that had not been changed since 2003.

The California Assembly unanimously passed a measure that requires a prison sentence for anyone convicted of sexually assaulting an unconscious person.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This past weekend, the number one film in the U.S. was the horror flick "Don't Breathe."

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "DON'T BREATHE")

DYLAN MINNETTE: (As Alex) We're trapped in here.

JANE LEVY: (As Rocky) There has to be a way out of here.

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Akhtar Soomro

Waseem Akhtar was sworn in today as the new mayor of Karachi, Pakistan's largest city. But he didn't get to settle into his brand-new office after the swearing-in ceremony.

Instead, he was rushed back to jail in an armored police vehicle.

Akhtar, a former member of parliament and member of the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) party in Pakistan, has been charged with arranging medical care for suspected terrorists and stoking violence and riots in 2007.

He hasn’t been found guilty of any crime, but has been under arrest since last month.

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Reuters/Ralph Orlowski

The French are telling Washington it’s time to call it quits. 

“Negotiations are bogged down,” said President Francois Hollande. “Positions have not been respected, it’s clearly unbalanced.” 

Hollande was talking about a massive trade deal that US and European Union diplomats have been negotiating for more than three years.

The Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership is probably best known by its acronym, TTIP — not to be confused with the TPP, the trans-Pacific trade deal that President Barack Obama is hoping will get through Congress.

The idea of black capitalism goes back many decades. Civil rights activists Booker T. Washington and Marcus Garvey advocated African-Americans creating and doing business with their own to build wealth in their community.

This summer, the killings of black men and the Black Lives Matter movement rekindled campaigns to #BuyBlack and #BankBlack — but it's a call some supporters find difficult to heed.

Maria Diaz sorts green bell peppers along an outdoor conveyor belt on a farm 25 miles west of Sacramento, discarding leaves and stems quickly before peppers are swept away by a mini-roller coaster onto a tractor-trailer.

Diaz, a single parent of three, is one of roughly 800,000 farmworkers in California. Under a bill recently passed by the California Legislature, Diaz could collect overtime pay.

Diaz says growers should pay overtime after eight hours. She adds that those extra earnings would help her cover child care.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Whether you're in Maine or Michigan, state fairs have their own smell — a mix of hot oil from the curly fries, and that unmistakable livestock tent.

One exhibit at this summer's Oregon State Fair, though, has a particularly distinctive funk. It's the one introducing a new crop: marijuana.

"It was this year that the state legislature designated cannabis as a farm crop. And the general public should know what it's all about," says Don Morse, the head of the Oregon Cannabis Business Council.

As part of the project A Nation Engaged, NPR and member stations are exploring America's role in the world heading into the presidential election.

Everyone knew President Obama would say something about gay rights when he visited Kenya last summer. Many American activists were pressing him to publicly condemn Kenya's colonial-era law making homosexuality a crime.

When a young African-American man dies in the city of Philadelphia, more than half the time there's one main reason why, says Scott Charles.

"It's because somebody pointed a gun at him and pulled that trigger. It's not because of cancer; it's not because of car accidents; it's not because of house fires. It's because somebody pointed a trigger," he says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The great comic actor Gene Wilder died Monday at age 83 from Alzheimer’s disease.

Known for his roles in such films as “Young Frankenstein,” “Blazing Saddles” and “Willie Wonka And The Chocolate Factory,” Wilder’s performances delighted audiences for decades.

Here & Now pays tribute by revisiting host Robin Young’s 2005 interview with Wilder about his then-new memoir, “Kiss Me Like a Stranger.”

Here’s the raw audio from their interview:

Array

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Spike Aerospace

A few years ago, entrepreneur Vik Kachoria was spending a lot of time up in the clouds flying from Boston to Europe to Asia. He had plenty of time to ponder this question: “Why aren’t we flying any faster?”

Computers have gotten faster, trains are faster, everything is faster. “In every industry we look at, except for aviation,” reasoned Kachoria.

One of the Islamic State's top commanders and the man in charge of disseminating its propaganda was killed in Aleppo, Syria, the group's semi-official Amaq news service announced.

Abu Mohammed al-Adnani, the news service said, was "martyred while surveying the operations to repel the military campaigns against Aleppo."

The report did not list a cause of death.

When Gene Wilder was 8 years old, his mother had a heart attack — and he took it upon himself to try to cheer her up. "It was the first time I ever tried consciously to make someone else laugh," Wilder said. "And when I was successful, after peeing in her pants, she'd say, 'Oh, Jerry, now look what you've made me do.' "

President Obama shortened the prison sentences of 111 inmates Tuesday, including 35 people who had expected to spend the rest of their lives in federal custody, authorities told NPR.

As an Egyptian-American, I had no idea how the rest of Africa felt about my country, or how Egyptians felt about being on the continent — until I saw the Twitter hashtag #IfAfricaWasASchool, which has been trending over the past week.

It made me laugh out loud. Clearly, we Egyptians are a bit snobby.

A holiday celebrating a dish beloved of many West Africans, World Jollof Day, was marked last week.

Jollof is a celebration dish. You eat it at parties, naming ceremonies, weddings, funerals — you name it, you will see the familiar and comforting pot of steaming jollof rice.

But jollof is also war – of the deliciously friendly variety.

As the Islamic State loses territory and retreats, it leaves behind grim evidence of its occupation: mass graves, filled with dozens or hundreds of bodies.

The Associated Press has documented 72 such graves in Iraq and Syria — and the wire service says many more are expected to be revealed as the Islamic State continues to cede ground.

There were 40 boats — some inflatable rubber vessels and others made of wood — packed with thousands of men, women and children who had decided the sea was safer than the land.

They set out from Libya. They did not have enough fuel to reach Europe.

Oh Pep! On World Cafe

13 hours ago

The Melbourne duo Oh Pep! combines the talent of Olivia Hally and Pepita Emmerichs. (You guessed it: The band's name is a derivative of both of theirs.) The two met in music school, where they studied classical music — but they shared a love of pop, and they found their work together was far superior to their solo projects.

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Juan Carlos for BuzzFeed News

International corporations have been able to avoid punishment for toxic pollution and worse by appealing to a secretive and little-known international tribunal. It’s called the Investor-State Dispute Settlement program, or ISDS. An 18-month investigation by BuzzFeed News raises serious questions about its judgement and its power.

If you doubt that Ryan Lochte is going on Dancing With The Stars to try to change the subject away from what he himself has called his "immature, intoxicated behavior" during the Rio Olympics, where he admits he lied about at least some of his story about being robbed at gunpoint, just ask him. It's not a secret.

When you praise a dog, it's listening not just to the words you say but also how you say them.

That might not be huge news to dog owners. But now scientists have explored this phenomenon by using an imaging machine to peek inside the brains of 13 dogs as they listened to their trainer's voice.

When people hear the word drought, they likely think of California. But there's also an extreme drought in parts of New England. The Northeast is experiencing the worst drought in more than a decade.

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