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A Minneapolis police officer is charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the case of an unarmed Australian woman who was shot and killed after calling 911 to report a possible crime.

It's been a bad week for Cambridge Analytica.

Talking About Periods in Public

3 hours ago

"Shark week," "Aunt Flo," "Carrie at the prom" — these are a few common nicknames for periods, according to Jennifer Weiss-Wolf, author of Periods Gone Public: Taking a Stand for Menstrual Equity. But the list is far from exhaustive: "There are something like 5,000 euphemisms for periods," she says.

Here's an album for 'third culture kids'

3 hours ago

There's a term for children who were raised in a culture outside of their own parents'. Usually these kids, known as "third culture kids" (or TCKs), spend their formative years in different countries. 

So, it can be a struggle for TCKs to understand their identity. They often feel like they don't fit in anywhere. This is exactly what the artist Sirintip expresses on her debut album, "Tribus." 

Fourteen-hour shifts on a ranch was grueling work. Yet this man, who requested anonymity, loved his job of tending to sick horses on the outskirts of Los Angeles. He adores the animals — he grew up caring for them in Mexico, his home country. His passion for the job shone through, even as he talked about the long hours and back-breaking work.

But this rancher, who is undocumented, is scared. His hands shook as he told his story. He is terrified of immigration officials finding him and deporting him back to Mexico.

For years Harjit Masih has been talking about what happened outside of the Iraqi city of Mosul, the Associated Press reported. He and 39 other Indian men — all construction workers working on the Mosul University campus — had been kidnapped by members of ISIS as the extremist group waged its assault on the city.

The Puzzle Of Quantum Reality

4 hours ago

There's a hole at the heart of quantum physics.

It's a deep hole. Yet it's not a hole that prevents the theory from working. Quantum physics is, by any measure, astonishingly successful. It's the theory that underpins nearly all of modern technology, from the silicon chips buried in your phone to the LEDs in its screen, from the nuclear hearts of the most distant space probes to the lasers in the supermarket checkout scanner. It explains why the sun shines and how your eyes can see. Quantum physics works.

Remember that skeleton hanging in the front of your biology — or art — classroom?

It's possible those bones are not plastic, but actual human remains. A lot of classroom skeletons, in high schools, universities and medical schools, are real.