Latest News from NPR

A group of gunmen attacked a cafe and have taken hostages in Bangladesh's capital, Dhaka, according to local media reports.

It's not clear whether there are any casualties or how many attackers might be involved.

The U.S State Department and local media say the cafe is in an upscale neighborhood called Gulshan that is home to many foreign embassies.

Since 2009, the U.S. has carried out hundreds of airstrikes in countries other than Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, the White House says, providing new details to the often secretive strikes — many of which were carried out via unpiloted drone aircraft.

The administration released these figures for the period from Jan. 20, 2009, to Dec. 31, 2015:

  • 473 airstrikes carried out outside of "areas of active hostilities"
  • Combatants: between 2,372 and 2,581 deaths
  • Non-combatants: between 64 and 116 deaths

Whenever July 4th lands on a Monday, travel surges as Americans take advantage of the long weekend. And you might assume the extra demand for gasoline would send pump prices higher.

But this year, drivers are discovering that prices have been falling in the run-up to the holiday — down to the lowest mid-summer levels in more than a decade.

Federal judges have blocked new restrictions on access to abortions in Florida and Indiana just hours before laws in those states were set to take effect.

This follows Monday's U.S. Supreme Court ruling that overturned a controversial Texas law imposing restrictions on the procedure, deeming them unconstitutional.

The Supreme Court this week delivered its strongest affirmation of a women's right to abortion in years. By a margin of 5-3, it struck down two key provisions of a Texas law restricting the procedure.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Edgar Rice Burroughs published the first of his Tarzan stories in 1912, just four years after, as the opening title cards of the long-in-development The Legend Of Tarzan inform us, Belgium's King Leopold II was forced to cede control of the so-called "Congo Free State" to the Belgian Parliament. He'd spent the prior couple of decades enslaving millions of residents of the Congo and using their forced labor to extract the region's rubber, diamonds, and other resources for his personal enrichment.

Gay Talese Disavows His Disavowal Of His New Book

2 hours ago

Author Gay Talese said he would not be promoting his latest book — and then changed his mind — after the Washington Post raised serious doubts about the story it tells.

Called The Voyeur's Motel, it's the nonfiction account of an Aurora, Colo., man named Gerald Foos, who says he bought the motel in question in order to spy on the sexual lives of his guests. The book combines Talese's reporting with Foos' own journals to produce a kind of retractable telescope of voyeurism: readers watching Talese watch Foos watch his guests.

Babies Of Color Are Now The Majority, Census Says

2 hours ago

Today's generation of schoolchildren looks much different than it did just a few decades ago. Non-whites are expected to become the majority of the nation's children by 2020, as our colleague Bill Chappell reported last year. This is now the reality among the very youngest Americans: babies.

The contestants wear flowers in their hair. And ribbons. And brightly colored tops.

They parade around. They're judged.

The winner gets a tiara, plus cakes, jars of honey and a coupon for a free haircut.

BOOK: GREAT JAZZ AND POP SINGERS

3 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MELISSA LEO

3 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MFA VS NYC

3 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

So you think that beer you brewed in your kitchen is ready for prime time, and you're thinking, "Maybe I should take the plunge and set up a little craft brewery."

You're not the only one with dreams infused with hops and malting barley. During the past couple of years, new breweries were being launched at the rate of three a day in the U.S.

New District Brewing is one of them. It just popped up in a cinder-block building in an Arlington, Va., light-industrial park.

n
Alina Simone

Stepping off the train in Jackson Heights, Queens, on a recent Sunday, I discovered two groups doing sonic battle in a courtyard ringed with shops: a Tibetan religious service led by crimson-robed monks versus a "Bangladeshi Americans for Bernie Sanders" rally. Later I looked up the name of the place: Diversity Square.

No surprise, given this is the epicenter of the most diverse neighborhood in America.

As of last weekend, we thought the show we'd be bringing you today would be primarily about Independence Day: Resurgence, which seems like the umpteenth sequel this summer to open with soft box office and exhausted reviews. But then we remembered: we don't have to see it.

Austria's highest court has overturned the results of the country's presidential election and ordered a re-do, citing vote-counting irregularities.

In the May runoff election, left-leaning, Green Party-backed candidate Alexander Van der Bellen defeated his far-right, anti-immigration rival Norbert Hofer by fewer than 31,000 votes. As we reported, his margin of victory was just 0.6 percent.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In the canyons of northern Mexico's Sierra Madre Occidental reside some of the fastest runners in the world: the indigenous Tarahumara population, who call themselves the Raramuri.

"Raramuri" means "foot-runner" or "those who run fast" in their native language.

p
Courtesy of Ella Purkiss

In January, after 13 months in limbo, Ella Purkiss, was finally granted survivor benefits from her deceased husband. She says if it had taken even one month longer she would have been evicted from her trailer home in Pahrump, Nevada.

Next Friday, after 60 years of living in the US, she will finally be granted American citizenship.

Turkey’s complicated relationship with ISIS

6 hours ago
R
Umit Bektas/Reuters 

There's a proverb in Turkish: "Feed a crow and it will pluck out your eyes."

That may be something that Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan is thinking about these days, after an attack on Istanbul's main airport on Tuesday killed 44 people and injured more than 230 others.

ISIS has not claimed responsibility for the attack, but Turkish officials blamed the group.

The Purge series is all concept, no execution.

For this most American of holidays, how do we define our music? What makes it uniquely American?

In 1929 George Gershwin wrote that it's "something deeply rooted in our soil." Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Music Director Marin Alsop said, "It's highly energized, rhythmic music derived from the blurring of lines between popular and serious styles."

Almost at the last minute, a federal judge has declared a controversial Mississippi law unconstitutional.

The law, HB 1523, would have protected religious objections to gay marriage, extramarital sex and transgender identities. The judge says it favors some religious beliefs over others and would codify unequal treatment of LGBT people.

The state's governor has said he looks forward to an appeal, but Mississippi's attorney general has expressed hesitation over appealing the case.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said she "fully expects" to endorse the recommendations of career prosecutors and FBI agents investigating the security of Hillary Clinton's email server, but stopped short of recusing herself from the politically charged case.

In an interview in Aspen, Colo., Lynch said she regrets that her unscheduled meeting with former President Bill Clinton on a Phoenix airport tarmac this week has "cast a shadow" over the investigation into his wife's email practices at the State Department.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages