The Two-Way
4:20 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

India Bans Film About Infamous 2012 Gang Rape

British filmmaker Leslee Udwin addresses a news conference about her film India's Daughter. India has ordered the film not to be shown pending an investigation into how filmmakers were able to interview the men convicted of the deadly rape of a 23-year-old woman in 2012.
Altaf Qadri AP

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 7:13 pm

India is banning a documentary about the deadly gang rape of a young woman in 2012 amid concerns over remarks made by one of her convicted rapists. The government also says it will investigate how the film crew gained access to him on death row.

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The Two-Way
4:15 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Ferguson Documents: Justice Investigation Backs Former Officer Wilson

People rally in Union Square before marching through the street in protest to the Ferguson grand jury decision to not indict officer Darren Wilson in the Michael Brown case.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 4:34 pm

When a grand jury decided not charge former Officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, Ferguson, Mo., ended up in flames.

Protesters decried the injustice and faced off violently with police officers and the National Guardsmen who were brought in to ensure peace.

Robert McCulloch, the prosecuting attorney in the case, also decided to release reams of documents with the evidence presented to the grand jury.

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Parallels
3:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

The Anti-Pollution Documentary That's Taken China By Storm

Journalist Chai Jing used $160,000 of her own money to produce a documentary on China's air pollution problem.
Screenshot/Under the Dome

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 8:29 pm

Two hundred million and counting: That's how many times a documentary about China's massive air pollution problem has been viewed online since the weekend. Environmentalists are hailing it as an eye-opener for Chinese citizens.

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NPR Story
3:17 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Smarter Robots In The Works

CoBot, short for Collaborative Robot, is designed to be an office helper. The bots, made by a team at Carnegie Mellon University led by professor Manuela Veloso, can navigate around a building on their own. They are also smart enough to know when to ask humans for help, such as to press buttons and open doors. (cs.cmu.edu)

Having robot office helpers could be pretty handy. But today’s machines are nowhere close to the smart, free-roaming robots you see in movies. Right now, robots couldn’t get around a building without tripping on chairs or getting stuck behind doors.

From Here & Now’s tech partner IEEE Spectrum, Prachi Patel reports on a new bot that will work better in human environments.

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NPR Story
3:17 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Mobile Gaming Prepares To Overtake Traditional Video Games

Mobile phone app designer Fung Kam-keung, CEO and founder of Awesapp Limited, plays on a smartphone with one of his latest app game called 'Yellow Umbrella' at the Awesapp Limited office in Hong Kong on October 23, 2014. (Nicholas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 3:49 pm

Mobile games – the apps you download onto your phone or tablet – used to be a bit of an afterthought in the gaming industry, behind the bigger console and computer markets.

But mobile games are growing fast, and are reaching millions of users who don’t consider themselves gamers.

The mobile gaming industry held its annual awards dinner last night, and the game Monument Valley took the Grand Prix.

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NPR Story
3:17 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

70 Years After Hitler's Death, Germany To Republish 'Mein Kampf'

One of two rare copies of "Mein Kampf," signed by the young Nazi leader Adolf Hitler and due for auction, are pictured in Los Angeles, California on February 25, 2014. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

Adolf Hitler’s manifesto “Mein Kampf” is a rambling, hate-filled, disjointed and sometimes unintelligible blueprint for the Third Reich. When a new annotated edition of the book is published in Germany in January 2016, it will mark the first time in almost 70 years that the text will be found in German bookstores.

After the war, the occupying allies banned the book, and the rights passed to Hitler’s home state of Bavaria. But the copyright expires at the end of the year, and all 16 German states have agreed that the book can be re-released, as long as it contains annotations.

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Shots - Health News
3:06 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Few Clues On Health Law's Future Emerge In Supreme Court Arguments

Opponents of the Affordable Care Act protest outside the Supreme Court Wednesday before oral arguments in the second major challenge to be heard by the justices.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 3:30 pm

For the second time in three years, the Affordable Care Act went before the Supreme Court Wednesday. And before a packed courtroom, a divided group of justices mostly picked up right where they left off the last time.

Once again, people inside the courtroom and out were left to wonder where Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Anthony Kennedy, considered swing votes in the case, stand. A decision is expected by the end of June.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Senate Fails To Override Obama's Veto On Keystone XL Pipeline

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 6:58 pm

The Senate has failed to override President Obama's veto on a measure to approve the Keystone XL pipeline project.

The final vote was 62-37, short of the two-thirds needed to override the presidential veto. Supporters of the measure had previously said they lacked the votes.

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The Two-Way
2:47 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Jawbone Fossil Fills Big Gap In Human Evolution, Scientists Say

This 2013 photo shows the LD 350-1 mandible just steps from where it was found in Ethiopia. The jawbone fragment is the oldest known fossil from an evolutionary tree branch that eventually led to modern humans, scientists say.
Kaye Reed AP

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 4:59 pm

A partial jawbone found in Ethiopia is the oldest human-related fossil, scientists say.

NPR's Christopher Joyce, who is reporting on the story, tells our Newscast unit that the discovery fills in an important gap in human evolution. He says:

"The fossil consists of a partial jawbone and several teeth. It dates to about 2.8 million years ago.

"The team says the fossil appears to belong to an individual from the beginning of the ancestral line that led to humans. That would make it the earliest known Homo — the human genus.

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Shots - Health News
2:45 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

College Help For Students Cuts Drinking, But Not For Long

Women and younger students were more likely to drink less after alcohol-education programs.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 1:09 pm

Most colleges require students to go through some sort of alcohol education program. When I was a freshman in college, I was required to play a video game that involved helping Franklin the frog navigate through various college parties without succumbing to alcohol poisoning. (Easy, Frank, remember to hydrate).

Other universities require students to watch educational videos or take online quizzes about appropriate alcohol use.

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