Author Interviews
4:52 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

'Don't Be Afraid Of The Bullets' A Memoir Of Reporting In Yemen

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Technology
4:50 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

FCC Approves New Rules Intended To Protect Open Internet

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

The Federal Communications Commission voted today to regulate Internet access more like a public utility, the vote split 3-2 along party lines. As NPR's Joel Rose reports, the vote reflects deep divisions over the future of the Internet.

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Law
4:50 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Legalized Pot In D.C. A Symbolic Victory For Marijuana Advocates

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
4:50 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Many Of Oregon's Coastal Schools, Hospitals And Fire Stations At Tsunami Risk

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Salt
4:38 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Will The Dietary Guidelines Consider The Planet? The Fight Is On

A government-appointed panel concluded in a recent report that Americans should eat less red meat and processed meat. A more plant-focused diet is better for health and the environment, it found.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:40 pm

When it comes to eating well, we should consider the health of our bodies and the planet. This was the recommendation coming from the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on Feb. 19.

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The Two-Way
3:57 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

South Korea Decriminalizes Cheating, Shares Of Contraceptive Companies Rise

Park Han-chul (center) president of South Korea's Constitutional Court, sits with other judges prior to the ruling on the country's adultery law Thursday in Seoul.
Lee Jin-man AP

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:59 pm

Extramarital sex is no longer a crime in South Korea, giving shares of contraceptive companies a boost.

On Thursday, South Korea's Constitutional Court struck down a decades-old law that made adultery a crime punishable by up to two years in prison.

NPR's Anthony Kuhn tell our Newscast unit that "roughly 100,000 people have been convicted of adultery since the law was passed in 1953, but conviction rates have recently fallen to below 1 percent."

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The Two-Way
3:01 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Banksy's Murals Turn Up In Gaza Strip

A mural is seen on the remains of a house that witnesses said was destroyed by Israeli shelling during a 50-day war last summer in Beit Hanoun in the northern Gaza Strip.
Suhaib Salem Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 5:45 pm

Banksy's work is now in the Gaza Strip.

The artist, who uses public spaces for his often-provocative murals, posted images that he said were of art he created in the Gaza Strip, along with a two-minute video of life in the Palestinian territory, titled "Make this the year YOU discover a new destination."

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The Two-Way
2:57 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Saudi Man Convicted Of Conspiracy In 1998 U.S. Embassy Bombings

Khalid al-Fawwaz, a Saudi man who the U.S. says was Osama bin Laden's top lieutenant in Britain, has been convicted on all four conspiracy charges tied to the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.

The AP reports that Al-Fawwaz's trial started a month ago in a fortified courthouse in New York. The trial focused on al-Qaida's early days. The AP adds:

"Al-Fawwaz stood expressionless as the verdict was read, pursing his lips briefly. He could face life in prison.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Remote Mexican Villages Build Their Own Cell Networks

Peter Bloom of Rhizomatica meets with the authorities in Tlahuitoltepec Mixe, Oaxaca. Rhizomatica is a non-profit group in Oaxaca city that has helped 16 remote villages install and operate their own cell phone networks. (rhizomatica.org)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 3:17 pm

Cellphones are just about everywhere these days. But in remote, rural places the key ingredient – a cell network – is often missing. In the U.S., long-distance users pay a surcharge into the Universal Service Fund, which the government uses to pay network operators to provide affordable phone access in rural or low-income areas.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

That Political Bumper Sticker Could Cost You Your Job

(kenudigit/Flickr)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 10:17 am

‘Tis the season to speculate who’s going to run for president, who will make it through the primary, who will ultimately end up in Oval Office.

But before you slap a bumper sticker on your car, or hang a political cartoon at work, you might want to think twice. Because it turns out that either of those could get you fired. And in most states in the country, labor laws will not protect you.

While federal law bars employers from firing workers for race, religion or gender, there is no protection for freedom of political speech or action.

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